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KSM hula hālau win first, third at Craver hula competition

Photo by Mehana Lee

Kumu Tori Hulali Canha and senior Kylie Wahineho'okae make lei in preparation for the 2013 Malia Craver Hula Kahiko Competition held on Saturday, May 11, 2013, at the St. Louis High School Gymnasium.

The high school hula hālau placed first for the ‘Ōlelo Hawai’i Division and third for the overall Wahine Division, Saturday, May 11, 2013 for the 2013 Malia Craver Hula Kahiko Competition held at St. Louis High School Gymnasium.. This was the first time that the KSM high school hālau placed first for the ‘Ōlelo Hawai’i Division.

Kumu Henoheo Kane selected fourteen hula dancers from Kamehameha Schools Maui to traveled to O’ahu this weekend to compete.

“We are so stoked! After performing today, we could really see that all of our hard work, lack of sleep and love for what we are doing paid off. I loved it and Kumu Henohea is super happy,” senior performer Kylie Wahineho’okae said.

There were nine high schools that entered in this secondary school hula competition. All hālau were from Maui and O’ahu.

The KSM high school hālau dancers have been taking time out of their schedules for after-school practices since March.

“I just wanted to take our hula to a different level by entering in this competition,” Kumu Henohea said.

The KSM girls danced to I Waikapū Ke Aloha. This song told a story about the moku, or sections, of Wailuku, Maui, and the specific winds of the four waters, also known as Na Wai ‘Ehā.

The costumes that the girls wore were also symbolic of the song.

“I picked the pā’ū texture based on the weight. I was envisioning how it would move on their bodies and was hoping that when they danced it looked like wai,” Kumu Henohea said.

The hālau also went to pick the palapalai fern for their adornments in ‘Īao Valley, which was also a place mentioned in the song they performed to.

“The best part was the journey it took to the competition with my hula sisters. We were really blessed and fortunate to be taught by Kumu Henohea and her hula ‘ohana,” senior performer Anuhea Arakawa said.

Mid-Pacific Institute of O’ahu came in first place and Seabury Hall of Maui came in second for the Wahine Division.

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