Spectacular ‘Into the Woods’ to open Friday

Play to run Nov. 7-8 and 14-15

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Photo by Kainoa Deguilmo

"Jack, Jack, Jack, head in a sack," says Junior Danaan Mitchell as she scolds her son Jack, played by Tre' Cravalho in the Drama Club's production of 'Into the Woods' opening this weekend at Keōpūolani Hale. The play will run at 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays this weekend and next, with additonal 2:00 matinees for the Saturday performances.

Whats Up Warriors, Carolynn Krueger, and Jaclyn Gorman

This play is not simply remembering lines and props. Not at all! Into the Woods is difficult, yet, when performed properly, it can really draw and pull the audience in. So, get ready to be pulled in.

The Drama Club has been working hard to prepare for Into the Woods: Act I and II, opening this weekend and also playing the next.

The innocence of Little Red Riding Hood, the sneakiness of the Wolf, the heartbreak of the Prince–on Friday, opening night, you won’t just be watching some ordinary fairy tale. The play features characters from different tales, such as Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, Rapunzel, and Little Red Riding Hood–all the stories that helped shape and mold our childhoods and imaginations.

Senior Carolynn Krueger, who plays the Witch convincingly, said “I really like this play. It takes stories from all the fairy tales, and it shows you the consequences that happen to them as a result of their actions.”

The Witch is one of the more challenging roles, as the character both sings and has speaking lines, but Krueger pulls it off with strong emotion and a dominant attitude.

“This show is definitely harder [than previous plays], especially with the vocals,” she said.

The singing completes the play because the unique vocals set the tone for certain scenes.

Many schools read, learn about and even perform Act I, which can serve as a stand-alone play. But the drama club will also be doing Act II. Act I already presents its challenges, but doing Act II is even more impressive. Expect nothing short of amazement and fun as the drama club presents a masterpiece.

Despite the large scale of the play, the actors and actresses have done a good job with their progress.

“People have been casted well,” Krueger said. “They all really match their parts, and the chemistry is definitely building.”

Junior Makayla Imaoka is looking forward to Friday night’s performance. She is voicing a female giant who is angry about the death of her husband. Hearing the booming voice will send a shiver down your spine.

“Unlike most of our musicals, this one is very mainstream so a lot of people have heard of it,” she said, “this is definitely our biggest production.”

ʻInto the Woodsʻ is playing this weekend at KSM!

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The choice of play and scale of the production has attracted some new members, who, Imaoka said, are “a lot better” than veteran performers thought they would be. In the midst of the huge project, the new members have adapted well and fit right in.

The dramatic portrayals and heartfelt singing show the quality and effort packed into this play and contribute to an overall enjoyable and spectacular performance.

“The audience will definitely enjoy the humor, the acting and sound effects,” Imaoka said.

“I just want the audience to take away good lessons, and, of course, to enjoy the story unfold,” Krueger said.

The play opens this Friday at 7 p.m. in Keōpūolani Hale. There are additional 7:00 performances on Saturday, Nov. 8, and Friday and Saturday, Nov. 14 and 15. There are also 2 p.m. matinees on both Saturdays. Admission is free.

The play is appropriate for all audiences; however, some of the villainous characters may be too intense for children under 8, and the length of the play may not be suitable for younger children.

Directed by club adviser, Ms. Victoria McGee, the play also employs the community talents of Tana Larson, musical director; choreographer Erin Kowalick, and set director Caro Walker.

Students are filling support positions in the house and back stage, completing duties like ushering, stage managing, and operating the lights and sound.