Sophomore parents prep for students’ upperclassman days

Sophomore+parents+prep+for+students%27+upperclassman+days

Photo by Landon Ballesteros

Grade 9-10 Counselor Jennifer Baum talks to parents of the sophomore class on Dec. 5 in Charles Reed Bishop Learning Center. Topics included the PSAT, academies, college preparation, and Hoʻolauleʻa responsibilities.

By Landon Ballesteros, news writer

The parents of the sophomore class attended Sophomore Parent night at 6 p.m. Tuesday evening in Charles Reed Bishop Learning Center to learn about their students’ future endeavors.

“I hope that [the parents] see the wide range of things that we offer our students here,” said Ms. Jennifer Baum, Grade 9-10 counselor

Ms. Baum opened up the meeting with a prayer, followed by a short welcome and introduction by 9-10 principal, Mr. Lance Cagasan.

Ms. Baum said that scores for this past October’s PSAT will be released soon. She said that the scores are good indicators of how students will actually score on the SAT. The results will help them determine what skills they should work on to prepare for taking the SAT. The sophomores will take the PSAT one more time in the first semester of their junior year.

Most of the time was spent going over the students’ academic plans for the next two years as they transition into the academy setting. Ms. Baum shared details about course offerings, including the UH Maui College dual credit courses.

Hawaiian History teacher Kumu Kapulani Antonio went over the Arts & Communications academy with a student-produced video showing what the students do academically in each of the endorsements. Students can endorse in Literary, Media, Visual, Musical, or Performing Arts, as well as the newly introduced Hawaiian Studies endorsement.

“We are building the future innovators and movers and shakers of our society,” Art teacher Ms. Angie Abe said in the video.

Spanish teacher Profesora Kristen Handalian introduced the Science and Natural Resources academy. The two endorsements within this academy are Natural Resources and Health Services.

“I would say about 60 to 70 percent of the sophomore class is considering Science and Natural Resources,” Ms. Baum said.

Next, Mr. Keali’i Mossman went over the Information and Technology and the Business and Leadership academies.

Mr. Mossman said that one of the changes being made to the IT Academy next year is the heavier emphasis on robotics theory in the Robotics and Engineering class.

“When you go into engineering, you don’t just get to pick up the wrench and build the machine,” Mr. Mossman said.

He also spent some time explaining why business is a good field of study to choose.

“Just look around you,” he said. “Is there anything in this room that you can see that wasn’t created by a business?”

Finally, Director of Alumni Relations Dancine Takahashi spoke to the parents about fulfilling their class kuleana of committing to 24 hours of Ho’olaule’a service to raise funds for Project Grad, which costs about $30,000. If a student is applying for a grant, additional hours are added onto the class commitment.

All of the parents in attendance earned two hours of Hoʻolauleʻa service for attending.